Don’t complain.

Photo of a woman holding a 1970s-style film camera to her face to take a photo.
Photo of a woman holding a 1970s-style film camera to her face to take a photo.
Photo of the author taking a photo. Used with permission. Photo by: Bill Worley

My most valuable work is not my best work. It’s not a personal project with hours of conceptualization and production behind it. It’s not the frame I made right at that single, beautiful moment where photographic luck and skill collide. My most valuable work is not the series that helped a non-profit bring in hundreds of thousands of dollars or the concert photos from my early photography years that I continue to license.

No.

My most valuable work is held in the hands of people as they grieve, as they mourn, and as they heal. Not so much a photograph…


Photography equipment // Photo by Annalise Kaylor

When photography became more than just a hobby for me, first as a part-time job and later a full-on career change, I joined a handful of online photography groups to expand my learning and find community. Like every other corner of the internet, these communities are full of advice and opinions, solicited or otherwise. Over the years, I’ve come to see several patterns emerge in these groups (I am a professional observer, after all) and I’ve rounded up some of the more common traps of advice into which newer photographers can easily fall.

1. Gear Shaming is Real. Your Gear is Enough.

Photographers like gear. Some of us love…

Annalise Kaylor

Annalise is a documentary photographer and video maker for an international NGO. She also has an almost-unhealthy love of birds and bird photography. Dog Mom AF

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